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Why is my axolotl not eating?

1. Moving stress

It’s not uncommon for axolotls to refuse food for a few days when they first arrive in a new home. Keep in mind, s/he is trying to adjust to a whole new environment, including a new owner, and possibly different food and feeding methods. Be patient! S/he will warm up to you once s/he realizes that there is nothing to be afraid of.

2. Problems with the food

Axolotls may ignore or spit food out when it’s too big, too hard, or it just has a nasty taste. Try cutting overlarge food in half. You can use scissors to cut up large earthworms, or a pill cutter to cut overlage pellets. Choose a pellet that softens rapidly in water. Avoid worms that taste bitter, such as red wigglers (Eisenia fetida). To avoid spoilage, don’t buy larger quantities of dry food than your axolotl can consume in approximately one month, and try to reseal the package properly after use. Don’t allow frozen food to thaw and then re-freeze.

3. Ammonia issues

Ammonia makes axolotls queasy, so they may refuse food or even throw up. If you’re keeping your axolotl in a tank, make sure your filter is properly cycled. In a tub, remember to do a full water change every day!

4. Aggressive tankmates

If your axolotl is moving away from food or staying hidden at feeding times, they may be afraid that moving towards the food will draw in their neighbor’s wrath — especially if they’ve gotten nipped at before. The solution is to feed the more aggressive axolotl in a separate container. If you’re worried about nipping at other times, it’s best to rehome the aggressive axolotl to another tank entirely.

5. Impaction

If your axolotl refuses to eat for several days in a row, they may have swallowed something that caused a blockage. I will be writing a separate article on the issue [coming soon!], but in the meantime, feel free to email me if you need help with this issue.

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How do I know if axolotls are the right pet for me and my family?

Do you want a pet that is very active?
Axolotls are sit-and-wait hunters. They don’t typically spend a lot of time swimming around. Mostly, they’ll walk around the tank, climb the decor, or use it as a flotation device. Their goofy poses can be entertaining, but if you want an aquatic pet that moves around a lot, it’s best to stick to fish. On the bright side, their tendency to stay still or move slowly makes them ideal photography subjects!

Are you able to keep their water cold?
Axolotls do best at temperatures between 15 and 18°C.  They can tolerate a range of 4 to 23°C, but at 24°C and above, they could get sick or even die. If your house gets very warm in the summer, it may be necessary to cool the water with air conditioning, fans or an aquarium chiller.

Do you understand the nitrogen cycle?
Before getting any aquatic pet, it’s important to understand the basics of keeping them alive in an aquarium. Please take a moment to read about the nitrogen cycle, its relation to new tank syndrome, and the proper way to cycle your filter before bringing an axolotl home.

Can you make a 10 year commitment?
Given proper housing conditions and care, axolotls can be expected to live 10 to 12 years in captivity. If you are buying an axolotl as a pet for your child, please make sure you are prepared to care for it as well!