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My breeders

I know you came here to see them, not read about them… I’ll be adding pictures slowly but surely! Thanks for your patience ; )

Line A (Axanthic)
I’m currently on the lookout for an axanthic dam. If you have one for sale, please contact me!

Freckles
Wild-type het. leucistic
Origin: K1
Genotype: A/X D/d g/g

Taco
Wild-type het. leucistic
Origin: K1
Genotype: A/X D/d g/g

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Pretzel
Melanoid copper axanthic
Origin: Leslee Vanden Top
Genotype: A/X c/c D/X g/g m/m ax/ax

Line B (Blue-gill)

Dame Bérénice (retired)
Wild-type het. white albino
Origin: K1
Genotype: A/a C/X D/d g/g M/X AX/X
• Brood B1 (Junior x Dame Bérénice, 2019)

Saria
Wild-type het. white albino
Origin: K2
Genotype: A/a C/X D/d g/g M/X AX/X
• Brood B2 (Junior x Saria, 2019)

Cerise
Solid blue-gill “dirty” leucistic
Origin: rescue
Genotype: A/X d/d g/g

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Junior
Blue-gill leucistic  het. albino
Origin: Nadine Comeau
Genotype: A/a C/X d/d g/g M/X AX/X
• Brood B1 (Junior x Dame Bérénice, 2019)
• Brood B2 (Junior x Saria, 2019)

Line C (Copper)
Looking for some nice and chubby Copper females! Contact me if you have one : )

Maya
Wild-type het. leucistic
Origin: K2
Genotype: A/X C/X D/d g/g M/X AX/X

Nori
Wild-type het. leucistic
Origin: K1
Genotype: A/X C/X D/d g/g M/X AX/X

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Pretzel
Melanoid copper axanthic
Origin: Leslee Vanden Top
Genotype: A/X c/c D/X g/g m/m ax/ax

Line D (“Dirty lucy”)

Cinnamon
GFP speckled (“dirty”) leucistic
Origin: Alyssa Grant
Genotype: A/X d/d G/X

Chai
GFP speckled (“dirty”) leucistic
Origin: Alyssa Grant
Genotype: A/X d/d G/X

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Falkor
Blue-gill leucistic het. albino
Origin: rescue
Genotype: A/a d/d g/g
• K1 brood (Falkor x Katla, 2017)
• K2 brood (Falkor x Katla, 2018)

Line G (High GFP)

Casey
GFP golden albino
Origin: Samantha Chapman
Genotype: a/a C/X D/X G/X M/X

Jade
GFP wild-type
Origin: Samantha Chapman
Genotype: A/X D/X G/X M/X AX/X

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Silk
GFP wild-type
Origin: Leslee Vanden Top
Genotype: A/X D/X G/X M/X AX/X

Line HI (High Iridophore)

Sesame
High iridophore wild-type het. melanoid white albino
Origin: Élevage maison axolotl MP
Genotype: A/a C/X D/X g/g M/m AX/X
• Brood HI1 (Phoenix x Sesame, Fall 2019)

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Phoenix
Golden albino het. leucistic
Origin: K1
Genotype: a/a D/d g/g M/X
• Brood HI1 (Phoenix x Sesame, Fall 2019)

Line K (Round-faced)

Katla
Wild-type het. white albino
Origin: rescue
Genotype: A/a C/X D/d g/g M/X AX/X
• K1 brood (Falkor x Katla, 2017)
• K2 brood (Falkor x Katla, 2018)

Gorgeous
Wild-type het. white albino
Origin: K1
Genotype: A/a C/X D/d g/g M/X AX/X

Obsidian
Wild-type het. white albino
Origin: K1
Genotype: A/a C/X D/d g/g M/X AX/X

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Falkor
Blue-gill leucistic het. albino
Origin: rescue
Genotype: A/a d/d g/g
• K1 brood (Falkor x Katla, 2017)
• K2 brood (Falkor x Katla, 2018)

Brazyn
GFP melanoid golden albino
Origin: Leslee Vanden Top
Genotype: a/a D/X G/X m/m

Line M (Melanoid)

The Cheat
High iridophore wild-type het. melanoid white albino
Origin: Élevage maison axolotl MP
Genotype: A/a C/X D/X g/g M/m AX/X

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Brazyn
GFP melanoid golden albino
Origin: Leslee Vanden Top
Genotype: a/a D/X G/X m/m

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Axolotl breeding, part 1: genetic and health considerations

Selecting a female

Female axolotls can lay up to 1000 eggs at once, which is exhausting for the female. She does not get a break to recover afterwards — her body immediately resumes gamete production, which comes with a high energy cost. For this reason, repeatedly beeding a female can be detrimental to her health. Breeding her too early can also interfere with her growth. Please be mindful of these considerations when choosing a female to breed — choose a female who’s fully grown (at least a year old) and has a healthy appetite and appearance, with a big round belly. Keep in mind that the same female should only be bred a maximum of three times in her lifetime, with a long break in between breedings. Personally, I try to breed females only once, unless they have exceptional characteristics. I also never breed females more than once a year.

Selecting a male

When it comes to choosing a male, the most important thing to consider is genetics. You’ll want to make absolutely sure that your male has no family relation with your female — this would lead to genetic defects in the offspring that can be quite dramatic. Beyond that, it helps to be familiar with how genes combine to create different morphs (phenotypes). Personally, I like to select males with traits that match the female’s best characteristic: for example, my “K” line is all about cute round faces, whereas my “B” line is all about blue gills.

Traits to avoid

You should never, ever breed axolotls with obvious genetic defects, such as:

  • dwarfism [article coming soon!]
  • short toes syndrome
  • “mini” features
  • any physical deformation that isn’t due to regrowth after nipping
  • a tendency to float frequently (especially upside down)
  • other recurrent health issues (e.g. very prone to fungus)

In case of accidental breeding

If you’ve accidentally kept a male and a female together and ended up with eggs, it may seem like the kind choice to keep them and raise them… But in reality, it’s the self-indulgent route that should be avoided in most cases. If the two parents are genetically related (e.g. brother and sister), or if one or both parents have genetic defects, you really wouldn’t be doing the larvae a favor by attempting to raise them. Not only would it compromise their quality of life, but it also poses a risk that the genetic issue will be passed on to future generations if those axolotls also end up getting bred (accidentally or otherwise).

Avoid this rookie mistake!

Another important point to consider is: how many of the eggs can you afford to keep? Raising larvae requires time, effort and space. They are also complicated and expensive to feed, compared to adults. If you are breeding axolotls for the first time, I wouldn’t recommend keeping more than 10. If you keep more than you are able to care for, you will be stretching your resources thin, and the quality of your care will suffer. Trust me — don’t try raising hundreds of axolotls on your first try. You have plenty of time to try your hand at raising more after you’ve brought these first 10 to maturity. You’ll be better prepared to tackle higher numbers once you have a clear idea of the challenges involved.

How to get rid of unwanted axolotl eggs

Freeze them. This will cause the larvae to go into hibernation mode, dulling their sense of pain before vital functions shut down. They will be unconscious before ice crystals begin to form. Once they are frozen solid, you can dispose of the eggs in the compost or trash.

Happy responsible breeding! : )